Horn of Africa Crisis situation report 3

4 August 2011

Highlights

  • An estimated 12.4 million people are in need of immediate humanitarian assistance in drought affected countries of the Horn – Somalia (3.7 million), Kenya (3.7 million), Djibouti (165,000) and Ethiopia (4.8 million).
  • At the epi-centre of the Horn crisis, access into Southern Somalia remains the overriding problem. The number of children in conditions of moderate and severe malnutrition is expected to continue increasing unless major gains in the delivery and distribution of emergency relief take place in the very near future.
  • UNICEF supported general feeding programs began this week in Dobley, near the Kenya border and the main transit route for populations moving to the Dadaab refugee camps in Dobley. This will be complemented by WASH and health interventions and vaccination activities.
  • The severity of the drought will continue to worsen until the peak dry period in September. Somali’s principal long rainsharvest estimate will be 50% below the 15 year average. While there is no immediate food security relief expected in worst hit (lowland) areas before next year, the main cereal harvests for Ethiopia and Kenya are likely to be at or near average.
  • UNICEF’s funding requirements for the Horn of Africa crisis is only 38% funded as of 4 August.

Humanitarian needs

  • An estimated 12.4 million people are in need of immediate humanitarian assistance in drought affected countries of the Horn – Somalia (3.7 million), Kenya (3.7 million), Djibouti (165,000) and Ethiopia (4.8 million). The increase of nearly 900,000 people since 20 July 2011 is mainly due to an additional 800,000 people in Kenya who are food insecure. The food security situation is being more closely monitored in north eastern Uganda.
  • Of the12.4 million, approximately 620,209 are Somali refugees affected by internal conflict and drought. On 3 August, FAO’s Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit for Somalia declared three additional areas of Somalia in famine conditions (Afgooye Corridor, areas of high IDP concentration in Mogadishu and Balad and Caadale districts in the Middle Shabelle region) in addition to three areas in Bay and Bakool declared on 20 July.
  • Prior to the declaration of famine in additional areas in South Somalia on 2 August, UNICEF estimated 2.3 million children in the four affected countries are malnourished of which nearly 570,000 are severely malnourished and thus at higher risk of death. This number is expected to continue increasing unless major gains in the delivery and distribution of emergency relief take place in the very near future.
  • In Kenya, FEWSNET forecasts continue to depict a worsening drought condition for the coming months. Compared to the first two months of the year, the average weekly admission of severely malnourished children in the drought affected areas has doubled, while that for moderately malnourished has increased by 23%.
  • In Ethiopia the situation in the Somali region was reported to be worsening with persistent emergency needs also in Oromia and SNNP regions. In Djibouti, rapid nutritional assessments among children under five years have highlighted a worsening situation in the northern regions of Obock and Tadjourah.
  • The severity of the drought will continue to worsen until the peak dry period in September. Somali’s principal long rains harvest estimate will be 50% below the 15 year average. While there is no immediate food security relief expected in worst hit (lowland) areas before next year, the main cereal harvests for Ethiopia and Kenya are likely to be at or near average.