Mary Deya, 28, holds her four-month old daughter Idia Flore in the stabilising centre of the Yei hospital in Yei, South Sudan, on April 26, 2017. Idia was admitted to hospital with severe acute malnutrition and Mary was not producing milk. After using the Supplementary Suckling Technique, whereby a tube is attached to the mother's nipple and fed from a bowl of therapeutic milk, Idia was fed and Mary was able to breastfeed again. Idia's twin died at home before being admitted to hospital.

The nutrition situation in South Sudan remains dire as the peak lean season approaches. In May 2017, UNICEF and partners screened 149,655 children (six to 59 months) with 6,068 identified with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and 18,892 with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Screenings in nine out of 10 states indicate malnutrition rates above the emergency level. Countrywide, an estimated 5.5 million people are now food insecure.

The security situation across the country remains unstable, severely impacting sustained humanitarian access. UNICEF continues to build upon existing community networks and other community-based resources to assess, plan and implement the humanitarian response, in order to strengthen local capacities and ensure accountability to affected populations.

Harvest season provides meagre respite to South Sudan’s hunger crisis

© UNICEF/Hatcher-Moore Mary Deya, 28, holds her four-month old daughter Idia Flore in the stabilising centre of the Yei hospital in Yei, South Sudan. Malnutrition rates soar especially among children, lean season forecast to start early. ROME/JUBA/HONG KONG, 6 November 2017 – The current harvest season in South Sudan will not end the hunger crisis as […]

A girl has her height recorded at a UNICEF outpatient therapeutic feeding centre at the Balukhali makeshift refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Sunday 15 October 2017.

As at 20 October 2017, well over half a million Rohingya people have crossed into Bangladesh’s southern district of Cox’s Bazaar since late August after escaping horrific violence in neighbouring Myanmar. They have joined some 200,000 others who came in earlier refugee influxes. Almost 60 per cent of the latest arrivals are children, crossing at a rate of between 1,200 and 1,800 per day.  High levels of severe acute malnutrition among young children have been found in the camps, and antenatal services to mothers and babies are lacking. Support for children traumatised by violence also needs to be expanded. Expanding the provision of safe water, sanitation and improved hygiene for Rohingya children is the top priority, amid concerns over a possible outbreak of diarrhea and other waterborne diseases. Most Rohingya children are not fully immunized against diseases such as measles. UNICEF is also focused on providing Rohingya children with learning and support services in child-friendly spaces, and working with our partners to address gender-based violence. UNICEF is calling for an end to the atrocities targeting civilians in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, and for humanitarian actors to be given immediate and unfettered access to all children affected by the violence there.  At present, UNICEF has no access to Rohingya children in Northern Rakhine State. At the end of September 2017, UNICEF announced that it is planning to establish more than 1,300 new learning centres for Rohingya children who have fled Myanmar to neighbouring Bangladesh. UNICEF is running 182 learning centres in Rohingya camps and makeshift settlements in Cox’s Bazar, and has enrolled 15,000 children. It plans to increase the number of learning centres to 1,500, to reach 200,000 children over the next year. The learning cent

Malnutrition rates among Rohingya refugee children in Bangladesh appear to be at least double earlier estimates

© UNICEF/LeMoyne A girl has her height recorded at a UNICEF outpatient therapeutic feeding centre at the Balukhali makeshift refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. GENEVA/COX’S BAZAR/NEW YORK/HONG KONG, 3 November 2017 –Preliminary data from a nutrition assessment conducted last week at Kutupalong refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, shows a 7.5 per cent prevalence […]

On 30 October 2017 in East Ghouta, rural Damascus, in the Syrian Arab Republic,  a child is measured by a health professional with a Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) measuring tape to determine whether or not he or she is suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

On 30 October 2017 in East Ghouta, rural Damascus, UNICEF participated in a United Nations humanitarian assistance convoy to Kafr Batna and Saqba in the besieged area.  UNICEF sent six trucks of humanitarian supplies as part of this convoy carrying health supplies such as oral rehydration solutions, medicines for children, vitamins, midwifery and pediatric kits.  Hygiene kits, nutrition supplements and high energy biscuits were also delivered.  Nearly 400,000 people remain trapped in East Ghouta, which has been under siege since mid-2013.  The UN and UNICEF were last able to access East Ghouta in September 2017, where the situation for women and children continues to worsen.

UNICEF delivers lifesaving supplies to Syria’s East Ghouta as part of United Nations humanitarian convoy

© UNICEF/UN0142210/Tom/OCHA On 30 October 2017 in East Ghouta, rural Damascus, in the Syrian Arab Republic, a child is measured by a health professional with a Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) measuring tape to determine whether or not he or she is suffering from severe acute malnutrition. AMMAN/HONG KONG, 31 October 2017 – UNICEF participated yesterday in […]

Growing number of unaccompanied refugee and migrant children in Greece in urgent need of shelter, care and protection

© UNICEF/UN057954/Gilbertson VII Photo Mariem, 8, a refugee from the Syrian Arab Republic, in her family’s shelter in Pikpa Village, an open refugee camp run by volunteers outside of Mytilini, Lesvos, Greece, Tuesday 14 March 2017. ATHENS/ GENEVA/ HONG KONG, 27 October 2017 – Only a third of the nearly 3,000 unaccompanied refugee and migrant children […]

Geneva Palais Briefing Note: Malnutrition among Rohingya child refugees

© UNICEF/UN0139599/LeMoyne This is a summary of what was said by UNICEF spokesperson Marixie Mercado – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva. GENEVA/ HONG KONG, 27 October 2017 – We are working to get a clear understanding on the extent of acute malnutrition […]

1.5 million vulnerable children in the Middle East threatened as winter approaches

UNICEF facing HK$468 million funding gap for lifesaving winter supplies and cash assistance that could leave 1.5 million children out in the cold. AMMAN/ HONG KONG, 26 October 2017 – The coming winter is the latest threat to children affected by crises in the Middle East. As UNICEF races to provide warm clothing, winter supplies and […]

Dada, 15, holds her 18-month-old daughter Husseina where shes live in a host community in Maiduguri, Borno State, northeast Nigeria, Saturday 29 July 2017. Dada was abducted by Boko Haram and became pregnant while in captivity. "There is an area near here where I used to go and they call me Boko Haram wife. Those people don’t know God,” says Dada. “I know she is my daughter, I don’t care why they say, I love her. Since I came back from Boko Haram there has been a lot of suffering, there is not enough to eat.”

“I like to chat with Husseina, I like to play with her,” adds Dada, “I want to put her in school. She needs good food and clothing. I think it is important to show her love and make her smile. I want her to be successful in life.”

As of 15 July, UNICEF and implementing partners in Nigeria have reached a total of 4,306 beneficiaries (3,039 children and 1,267 women) formerly associated with armed forces or armed groups including women and girl survivors of conflict-related sexual violence, with community-based reintegration services and short-term reintegration assistance packages, social cohesion and livelihood support.

UNICEF is providing psychosocial support for children who have been held by Boko Haram and is also working with families and communities to foster the acceptance of children when they return. This includes providing social and economic reintegration support to the children and their families.

The ongoing crisis in the Lake Chad basin is marked by massive violations of children’s rights – evident in the use of children on both sides of the insurgency. Boko Haram, in particular, has been leading a systematic campaign of abduction that has forced thousands of girls and boys into their ranks. Local militias, formed to protect their communities, have played a key role in stemming the  tide of Boko Haram violence, but they too have used children in their operations.

UNICEF estimates that thousands of children are being held

At current rates of reduction, it will take over 100 years to end child marriage in West and Central Africa

© UNICEF/UN0118457/ Dada, 15, holds her 18-month-old daughter Husseina where she lives in a host community in Maiduguri, Borno State, northeast Nigeria, Saturday 29 July 2017. Dakar/HONG KONG, 23 October 2017 – Unless progress is seriously accelerated, it will take over 100 years to end child marriage in West and Central Africa, with far-reaching, life-altering consequences […]