On 16 October 2017, Rohingya refugees including women and children cross into Bangladesh at Palong Khali in Cox’s Bazar district. Between 10000 and 15000 newly arrived Rohingya refugees fleeing Myanmar crossed into Bangladesh, and are stuck in Palong Khali in Cox’s Bazar district approximately 2 kms from the border with Myanmar.  Thousands of people are queuing up on pedestrian road in the midst of paddy fields and waterbodies in a queue approximately 1 km long. Thousands among them are children. People making long journeys by walking and crossing the river are in desperate condition. They are exhausted, dehydrated, hungry and are urgently in need of water. People are getting sick due to dehydration, while lots are also traumatized. Some children have been separated from their families during their journey. UNICEF has mobilized resources for the newly arrived Rohingyas. Two water trucks carrying 6000 litres of water and 2000 jerrycans are on the site for distribution. Distribution started this morning by boat to the refugees located near the border area.  Another 20,000 bottles of water each containing 1.5 litre are on the way from Chittagong. UNICEF is prepositioning two mobile child friendly spaces at the site for assessment and family tracing and reunification. UNICEF also plans to mobilize immunization and nutrition screening for this new influx.  Two UNICEF nutrition and health teams are currently on the ground.

As of 15 October 2017, at least 795,000 Rohingyas are estimated to be sheltering in Bangladesh, having fled violence and persecution in Myanmar. Violence which began on 25 August has triggered a massive and swift refugee influx across the border - an estimated 582,000 people have arrived. These refugees have joined some 213,000 people who were already in Bangladesh following earlier waves of displacement.  The Rohingya population in Cox’s Bazar is highly vulnerable, many having experienced severe trauma, and are now living in extremely difficul

Two months since outbreak of violence in Myanmar, Rohingya refugee children still at acute risk

© UNICEF/UN0136209/LeMoyne On 16 October 2017, Rohingya refugees including women and children cross into Bangladesh at Palong Khali in Cox’s Bazar district. NEW YORK/GENEVA/DHAKA/HONG KONG, 23 October 2017 – Nearly two months since Rohingya families began fleeing en masse to Bangladesh, thousands of children and women are still without basic lifesaving services, UNICEF said today. The […]

On 5 September 2017 in Bangladesh, Mohammed Yasin, 8, is amongst the newly arrived Rohingyas living in shelters at the Kutupalong makeshift camp in Cox's Bazar.

By 5 September 2017, more than 146,000 Rohingya refugees fled across the border from Rakhine State, Myanmar, into Cox's Bazar district, Chittagong Division in Bangladesh since 25 August. As many as 80 per cent of the new arrivals are women and children. More than 70 000 children need urgent humanitarian assistance. More than 100,000 of the newly arrived refugees are currently residing in makeshift settlements and official refugee camps that are extremely overcrowded while 10,000 newly arrived refugees are in host communities. In addition, 33,000 arrivals are in new spontaneous sites, which are quickly expanding.  While some refugees are making their own shelters, the majority of people are staying in the open, suffering from exhaustion, sickness and hunger. Cox’s Bazar district of Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable districts, not only for its poor performance in child related indicators but also for its vulnerability to natural hazards.  Most people walked 50 or 60 kilometers for up to six days and are in dire need of food, water and protection. Many children are suffering from cold fever as they are drenched in rain and lack additional clothes. Children and adolescents, especially girls, are vulnerable to trafficking as different child trafficking groups are active in the region. Many more children in need of support and protection remain in the areas of northern Rakhine State that have been wracked by violence.

In Bangladesh, UNICEF is scaling up its response to provide refugee children with protection, nutrition, health, water and sanitation support. With the recent influx of refugees, demand has increased and UNICEF is working to mobilize more support and strengthen its existing activities. For recreational and psychosocial support to the newly arrived Rohingya children, 33 mobile Child Frien

Violence in Myanmar driving up to 12,000 Rohingya refugee children into Bangladesh every week

© UNICEF/Brown Mohammed Yasin, 8, is amongst the Rohingyas refugee children living in shelters at the Kutupalong makeshift camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. UNICEF urges donors to support humanitarian appeals ahead of international pledging conference. DHAKA, BANGLADESH/GENEVA/HONG KONG, 20 October 2017 –Desperate living conditions and waterborne diseases are threatening more than 320,000 Rohingya refugee children […]

On 27 September 2017,  Jamilet Segura Gutierrez, 10, on her cot inside an a army tent at the La Perseverança shelter in Jojutla, Morelos, one of the hardest hit by the 19 September earthquake that struck Mexico. Jamilet said "I was in school and I thought the tree was going to fall over me. Many windows broke.  Now I'm afraid it will happen again, and even more strong."

As at 26 September 2017, 10,000 schools have been damaged or destroyed in Mexico following two powerful earthquakes that struck less than two weeks apart, threatening access to education for millions of children. Some seven million children live in areas affected by the earthquakes on September 8 and September 19.  UNICEF is working with its partners in areas affected by the earthquakes to establish temporary schools, promote school safety guidelines, train teachers in psychosocial support, and distribute education supplies and early childhood development kits to teachers and caregivers. Both earthquakes have resulted to 407 casualties, 190,000 buildings and 10,000 schools damaged in 8 states.  The Ministry of Education has announced an 8 step plan for a gradual return to school. All public schools need to be officially certified for safety conditions in the buildings to re- open. The Ministry of Education has announced UNICEF’s support in schools to help students deal with their fear or trauma.  After UNICEF ́s deployment to all affected areas to make a rapid assessment of the situation of children and women, 26 municipalities have been selected for interventions, mainly in education and child protection. Overall, the number of children targeted will be the 20,000 already identified in the South of Mexico, plus 40,000 in Central Mexico. Two UNICEF child friendly spaces were installed in Oaxaca, providing psycho-social support and each accommodating 300 children per week.

In children’s thoughts

© UNICEF/UNI204560/Zehbrauskas Two powerful earthquakes struck Mexico less than two weeks apart in September 2017, with some seven million children living in the affected areas. While children experience earthquakes through the deaths of loved ones and the destruction of their homes and schools, they also have to deal with the ensuing fear and trauma. Children staying […]

A nurse feeds a baby donor milk undergoing treatment at the Special Newborn Care Unit (SNCU) at the Government hospital  in Nalgonda District. Telangana State, India.

7,000 newborns die every day, despite steady decrease in under-five mortality, new report says

© UNICEF/UN0135350/Selaam A newborn is fed donor milk by a nurse at the Special Newborn Care Unit (SNCU) at the Government hospital in Nalgonda District. Telangana State, India. At current trends, 30 million newborns will die within first 28 days of life between 2017 and 2030. NEW YORK/GENEVA/WASHINGTON/HONG KONG, 19 October 2017 – Every day in […]

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(Chinese only) Run for every child

(Chinese only) 近年,由視障及聽障人士組成的猛龍隊連番出戰多個慈善活動,早已為人所知。其中一個他們從2011年起參與及支持至今的項目,就是聯合國兒童基金會(UNICEF)慈善跑。今年,他們將會繼續參賽,期望籌集更多善款,幫助更多有需要兒童。 創隊成員之一莫儉榮(Kim)每年都落場為兒童跑,目標一年比一年高,只為幫到更多兒童,讓他們得到應有資源及權利。「13歲那年,我因意外完全失明,錯過了與同齡孩子學習的機會,除要花很多時間、心力追回進度,亦因此失去與同學共同成長的時光。」切身經歷讓他明白兒童適時接受教育很重要,「如果一個孩子因為貧窮或疾病等原因錯失寶貴的早期發展機會,將會影響他日後的全面發展。我希望未來不再有一名兒童被遺忘。」 Kim透露,每次比賽他們都以三人為一組,領跑員替他們確認前方路綫及取水,視障及聽障跑手中間則以繩子繫着,互相幫忙跑到終點。「每跑完一公里,我的隊友都會大叫一聲示意,若跑10公里賽事,當他叫到第10聲時我便知道賽事完結。」別看輕這個提示,對看不見前路的Kim來說,知道跑步里數是莫大鼓勵,讓他有清晰的目標和堅定的動力向前進。「以前,我認為殘疾人士不能幫助別人,但當我和聽障人士攜手合作,我們的能力便強大很多,除可發揮自己的潛能,更可幫助別人。別以為個人力量很渺小,只要拍住上,我們可以很強大。」雖然UNICEF慈善跑已截止報名,但我們仍可透過捐款支持猛龍隊及各跑手,集合更多資源幫助全球每一名兒童。(詳見:http://run.unicef.org.hk) 原文刊登於2017年10月19日《星島日報》「放眼世界」「攜手為兒童」專欄

Students who received school bags provided by UNICEF line up at Al-Saeed School in Ibb, Yemen, Tuesday 12 January 2016.

As of November 2016, almost two years of conflict in Yemen have left 18.8 million people - some 70 per cent of the population - in need of humanitarian assistance. After the United Nations-backed peace talks were suspended in August 2016, airstrikes and hostilities intensified and civilians are paying the price. Close to 4,000 civilians have died as a direct result of the conflict, including 1,332 children. At least 14.5 million people lack access to safe water and sanitation and 14.8 million have limited or no access to health services, compounding a cholera crisis that has put 7.6 million people at risk. The nutrition situation has deteriorated, with 3.3 million children and pregnant or lactating women suffering from acute malnutrition and more than 460,000 children under 5 suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The near collapse of national services has left an estimated 2 million children out of school. Almost 2.2 million internally displaced persons, nearly half of them children, as well as 1 million returnees and many host communities are also in need of assistance. Ongoing conflict and the deteriorating economic situation have put essential public services such as health on the verge of collapse, leaving children and women at even higher risk.

Endless violence shutters schools, teachers unpaid for a year, threatening education for 4.5 million children in Yemen

© UNICEF/Farid Students line up at Al-Saeed School in Ibb, Yemen. Statement by Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa. AMMAN/HONG KONG, 18 October 2017 – “More than two and a half years of renewed conflict in Yemen have once again put the education of 4.5 million children on the line, […]

Girls sit on the ground after school at the Upper Nile primary school in the Protection of Civilians (PoC) site in Bentiu, South Sudan, Monday 1 May 2017.

As of May 2017, the United Nations’ protection of civilians (PoC) site in Bentiu, Unity State, is home to more than 120,000 internally displaced South Sudanese. Surrounded by war and famine, children and their families are seeking safety in the PoC from armed groups involved in the ongoing conflict across the country. The displaced are forced to live in overcrowded conditions and are reliant on international aid organisations for the basics like food and sanitation. 

Around 60 per cent of those displaced are under 18 years of age and it is estimated that more than 33,000 children are attending UNICEF supported schools in the PoC. Schools such as Upper Nile School cater for the huge youth population, but classes are overcrowded. With upwards of 70 children per classroom and educational resources scarce, UNICEF and its partners are working to improve access to education through the provision of basic education supplies, as well as training and allowances for volunteer teachers.

For those attending classes at the Upper Nile School, classes offer some respite from the ongoing war. Insecurity, ongoing displacement and attacks on schools mean that nearly three quarters of the country’s children are out of school — the highest proportion of out-of-school children in the world. 

Education is central to the humanitarian response for those living in PoCs across South Sudan. Many have witnessed unspeakable horrors and suffer the trauma associated with war. Education is one ray of light shining through the cracks of their young country.

South Sudan Conflict: 5,000 children reunited with family by Save the Children, UNICEF and partners

© UNICEF/UN068330/Hatcher-Moo4000re Girls sit on the ground after school at the Upper Nile primary school in the Protection of Civilians (PoC) site in Bentiu, South Sudan, Monday 1 May 2017. JUBA/HONG KONG, 18 October 2017 – Since conflict broke out in South Sudan in 2013, Save the Children, UNICEF and partners have successfully reunited more than […]

On 6 September 2017, (foreground) a Rohingya family from Myanmar who had crossed the border into Bangladesh are waiting to be transported to the nearby Balukhali makeshift settlement for Rohingya refugees in Cox's Bazar District, Bangladesh.

By 5 September 2017, more than 146,000 Rohingya refugees fled across the border from Rakhine State, Myanmar, into Cox's Bazar district, Chittagong Division in Bangladesh since 25 August. As many as 80 per cent of the new arrivals are women and children. More than 70 000 children need urgent humanitarian assistance. More than 100,000 of the newly arrived refugees are currently residing in makeshift settlements and official refugee camps that are extremely overcrowded while 10,000 newly arrived refugees are in host communities. In addition, 33,000 arrivals are in new spontaneous sites, which are quickly expanding.  While some refugees are making their own shelters, the majority of people are staying in the open, suffering from exhaustion, sickness and hunger. Cox’s Bazar district of Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable districts, not only for its poor performance in child related indicators but also for its vulnerability to natural hazards.  Most people walked 50 or 60 kilometers for up to six days and are in dire need of food, water and protection. Many children are suffering from cold fever as they are drenched in rain and lack additional clothes. Children and adolescents, especially girls, are vulnerable to trafficking as different child trafficking groups are active in the region. Many more children in need of support and protection remain in the areas of northern Rakhine State that have been wracked by violence.

In Bangladesh, UNICEF is scaling up its response to provide refugee children with protection, nutrition, health, water and sanitation support. With the recent influx of refugees, demand has increased and UNICEF is working to mobilize more support and strengthen its existing activities. For recreational and p

Geneva Palais Briefing – UNICEF Rohingya refugee response funding

© UNICEF/Brown Rohingya children and families flee to Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh. More than half a million new refugees have crossed into Cox’s Bazar since 25 August. This is a summary of what was said by UNICEF spokesperson Marixie Mercado – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at […]

On 15 October 2017 in Amman, Jordan, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan met Grade 9 Syrian girls at the Sai’ed Noureddin double shifted public school in Amman. There are over 800 Syrian students in the school and is one of the public schools in Jordan that operates in two shifts to accommodate Syrian children. 
“Returning to Jordan to meet children whose hope has been restored through education has compelled me to raise my voice even louder for the 27 million children who remain out of school because of conflict. I recommit myself to represent all of the children whose voices have been silenced for too long – and whose chance to learn, and of hope for a better future have been destroyed by war," said Muzoon. 
The Ministry of Education, with support from UNICEF and donor countries, has opened over 200 such double shifted schools to ensure access to education for Syrian children. In addition, a catch up education programme helps children aged 9 to 12 who have missed more than 3 years of schooling to accelerate their learning and join the grade appropriate to their age.

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan travelled to Jordan to meet children who, like her, fled the Syrian conflict and are now determined to go to school despite extremely challenging circumstances. It was the first time Muzoon had returned to the country – where she spent three years in refugee camps, before being resettled in the United Kingdom with her family in 2015. “Returning to Jordan to meet children whose hope has been restored through education has compelled me to raise my voice even louder for the 27 million children who remain out of school because of conflict. I recommit myself to represent all of the children whose voices have been silenced for too long – and whose chance to learn, and of hope for a better future have been destroyed by war," said Muzoon. Around 2.4 million Syrian children are missing out on education, including 1.7 million inside the Syrian

Muzoon Almellehan returns to Jordan to meet Syrian refugees striving to get an education

© UNICEF/UN0135670/Rich/Photographer On 15 October 2017 in Amman, Jordan, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan met Grade 9 Syrian girls at the Sai’ed Noureddin double shifted public school in Amman. There are over 800 Syrian students in the school. AMMAN/NEW YORK/HONG KONG, 16 October 2017 – UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan travelled to Jordan to meet children […]

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Racing to prevent cholera in Rohingya refugee camps

©UNICEF 2017 / Lemoyne “When he wakes up he’s crying all the time. Something really bad is going on with him,” says Rohingya refugee Hasina. What’s the situation? A humanitarian crisis of near biblical proportions. Since 25 August, 515,000 Rohingya have crossed from Myanmar to Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh. They tell stories of villages being […]