Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake marking the 50th Anniversary of UNICEF being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

 

Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake marking the 50th Anniversary of UNICEF being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

NEW YORK/HONG KONG, 6 October 2015 – “In accepting the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of UNICEF in 1965, UNICEF’s second Executive Director, Henry Labouisse, said that “the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace of tomorrow’s world.” Today, in a world of growing turmoil, his words still ring true. And they speak to us all.
“For while a child born in 2015 has a far greater chance to survive and fulfil her potential than a child born in 1965, the welfare of far too many children today is jeopardized by conflict and crisis, deprivation and disadvantage. Many are seeing and experiencing things no child should ever face. And in every society, far too many children are growing up deprived of all they need to grow up healthy and strong.

“When we work in common cause to reach these children – to alleviate their suffering, to help them grow and learn – we are not only giving them a chance at having a future. We are giving them a chance at building a better future for themselves, their families and their societies. A generation of children not only able but willing to create stronger, more stable, peaceful societies. A generation healed, not hardened.

“Every child has the right to the quiet blessing of a normal childhood. UNICEF has worked every day since we were honoured with the Nobel Peace Prize, as we will continue working every day, to advance that right for every child, everywhere. For this is the surest path to a future where peace is possible.”
The official document commemorating the awarding of the 1965 Nobel Peace Prize to UNICEF "for the promotion of brotherhood among nations". The award was presented to UNICEF's second Executive Director Henry Labouisse on 10 December 1965. UNICEF became a co-recipient of the prize again with the awarding of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the United Nations and Secretary-General Kofi Annan "for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world". The 1965 document was photographed in July 2005 at UNICEF House.
© UNICEF/NYHQ2005-0931/Davey
The official document commemorating the awarding
of the 1965 Nobel Peace Prize to UNICEF “for the
promotion of brotherhood among nations".